Stem Cell Stories That Caught Our Eye: Repairing Radiation Damage, Beta Thalassemia Clinical Trial And Disease Models

Date (2015-02-09 )

Here are some stem cell stories that caught our eye this past week. Some are ground breaking science, nurse others are of personal interest to us, check and still others are just fun.

Stem cells repair brain damage from radiation therapy. Radiation for brain cancer can be a lifesaver but it can also be a dramatic life changer. If often leaves patients with considerably reduced brain function. Now a team at New York’s Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center has found a way to instruct human stem cells to repair some of that damage—at least in rats.

The damage seems to be to the middle-man or so-called progenitor cells that maintain the myelin cells that insulate the nerves in the brain. When that myelin is damaged by the radiation those progenitor cells are no longer able to make repairs and that results in reduced nerve function. Rats given the stem cells regained both cognitive and motor skills lost after brain radiation.

The team leader, Viviane Taber, noted this work could make radiation therapy even more of a lifesaver. ScienceDaily quoted Tabar from materials provided by Cell Press that published the work:

“This will have to be proven further, but if we can repair the brain effectively, we could be bolder with our radiation dosing, within limits.”

This could be especially important in children, for whom physicians deliberately deliver lower radiation doses.

Stem cell trail for Beta-Thalassemia cleared to begin. CIRM-grantee Sangamo BioSciences announced this week that the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) had accepted its application to begin a clinical trial using genetically edited stem cells to treat patients with beta-thalassemia. This trial, in patients who require regular blood transfusions to survive, is the ninth CIRM-funded clinical trail to gain clearance from the FDA.

Other clinical trials have used genetically modified stem cells, but they have used various techniques to add a correct gene or silence an unwanted gene. This will be the first clinical trial using one of the newer techniques that actually goes into a person’s genes and edits them to correct a disease. We wrote about this beta-thalassemia project here.

The Sacramento Business Times picked up the company’s press release that quoted Sangamo president Edward Lanphier on the company’s goal, “the aim of providing transfusion-dependent beta-thalassemia patients with a one-time treatment for this devastating disease.”

Disease modeling for science wonks. Vivien Marx wrote a feature article for Nature Methods that provides the most thorough review of the use of reprogramed iPS-type stem cells as disease models that I have read. In particular she discusses the power of using new gene editing tools to modify the cells so that when they mature into adult tissues they will display specific disease traits.

She starts with a narrative about CIRM-grantee Clive Svendsen’s work to understand spinal muscular atropohy (SMA) when he was in Wisconsin and to understand amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) now at Cedars Sinai in Los Angeles. She goes on to show just how powerful these gene-edited stem cells can be, but also how difficult it is to use the technology in a way that generates useful information. Marx is a strong science journalist, who for many years has shown a skill at explaining complex technologies.

She also discusses the various iPS cell banks developed around the world including CIRM’s cell bank and the value of having non-gene-edited cells from patients that naturally show the disease traits.

Thorough review of changes at CIRM. Alex Lash at xconomy wrote an in-depth overview of our president Randy Mills’ plans for the next phase of our agency that Randy calls CIRM 2.0. Calling the plans an extensive “renovation” Lash described the portions of the new structure that were already in place and listed the ones set to come online in the next six months.

As a balanced journalist he runs through some of the highs and lows of our public perception during the initial phase of the agency and then discusses the new tone set by Mills:

“CIRM is less a grant-making government agency than a ‘discerning investor’ that’s going to be ‘as creative and innovative’ as possible in getting treatments approved, Mills says. ‘We have no mission above accelerating stem cell therapies to patients.’ ”

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